Ruffles, Bobbles, and Granny Squares for Your Crochet Afghan

Last week I shared with you a few of my favorite granny squares from The Big Book of Granny Squares: 365 Crochet Motifs. If you remember, I said that, with 365 motifs, I could only share a few of my favorites. It wasn’t enough. There are so many amazing granny squares, I have to share just a few more with you.
Off-Center Granny
  Sweet Granny   Heartfelt

Granny Squares

No book of crochet motifs would be complete without examples of the popular granny square. But this book takes this classic design one step farther, offering both classic granny square designs as well as modern interpretations. I love the addition of single crochet stitches in A Sweet Granny.

God’s Eye
  Bobble Frame   ZigZag

Bobble Squares

A great technique for creating subtle texture is crochet bobbles. Worked in the same color as the rest of the square, the raised bobble stitches create a 3-D texture that is more understated. These squares are the perfect option for combining with some of the more complicated squares in this book. And wouldn’t the Bobble Frame square be fun with a design embroidered within the frame of the bobbles?

Hibiscus
  Coral   Frame Ruffle

Ruffle Squares

Ruffles are a great way to create textured crochet squares. We’ve all created unintentional ruffles on a project, so we know they are easy, and it’s fun to put those ruffles to a beautiful use. You can create a representation of the Great Coral Reef or a beautiful flower.

Get all 365 of these incredible squares. Order or download your copy of The Big Book of Granny Squares: 365 Crochet Motifs today and discover all of the amazing crochet squares.

 

Best wishes,

P.S. Share your favorite granny square in the comments.

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Toni Rexroat

About Toni Rexroat

Toni Rexroat is the Online Editor of Crochet Me. Outfitted with several crochet hooks and surrounded by bins of yarn, she has been the assistant editor for Interweave Crochet magazine as well as PieceWork, Interweave Crochet’s sister magazine. She was born and raised in a little town in Wyoming where she was exposed to wool and other fibers at an early age, and began crocheting in her early teens. Enjoying a wide variety of fibery hobbies from crochet and knitting to sewing, she is determined to learn to spin so she can crochet with her own yarn.

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