Learn How to Tunisian Crochet

Apr 26, 2012

Tunisian crochet is much more than a fascinating new crochet stitch or a design to try. And you don't have to be an experienced or even an intermediate crocheter to pick up a Tunisian crochet hook and create something amazing. Tunisian crochet is a crochet technique with similarities to both crochet and knitting but also brings many of its own benefits to the table.

Tunisian Crochet Shawl  
Five Peaks Shawl
 

Worked with a single crochet hook with either a long symmetrical shaft or a long flexible cord, Tunisian crochet is created by picking up a loop in the stitch and leaving that loop on the hook, then moving to the next stitch. Once all of the indicated loops have been picked up, work the return pass, yarning over and drawing through the loops on the hook to work the loops off the hook and finish the stitch.

 
Tunisian Crochet Wrap
  Red Rocks Wrap

Sound a little confusing? Tunisian designer Kim Guzman is ready to walk you through each step and explain how a variety of Tunisian stitches, decreases, and increases work in A Step-By-Step Guide to Tunisian Crochet, the newest eBook from Interweave Crochet. You will also find five of our favorite patterns with which to perfect your new skills.

Tunisian Crochet Afghan
 
Mulled Spices Afghan
 

The Five Peaks Shawl, Red Rocks Wrap, and Mulled Spices Afghan are worked in Tunisian simple stitch, the most popular Tunisian stitch. Tunisian simple stitch creates a dense and luxurious stitch, perfect for projects such as afghans, shawls, or coats that are designed for warmth. The unique shaping of the Five Peaks Shawl not only helps it stay in place on your shoulders but also introduces you to basic increases and decreases.

The classic Tunisian simple stitch stripes of the Mulled Spices Afghan are easily adaptable to a myriad of color combinations. And if you are looking for a bit more of a challenge, jump into the entrelac border. I think this design element is my favorite part of this cozy afghan and quite simple to work once you get the hang of the entrelac technique.

 
Tunisian Crochet Tunic
 
Spice Market Tunic

Of course, Tunisian simple stitch is not the only stitch available in the Tunisian arsenal. The Spice Market Tunic combines the Tunisian simple stitch with Tunisian purl stitch to create a delicately textured full-coverage fabric, and Tara's Tunisian Scarf introduces you to creating Tunisian lace.


 
Tara's Tunisian Scarf
 

Begin your Tunisian crochet adventure and explore the possibilities of this beautiful technique. Download Interweave Crochet Presents A Step-By-Step Guide to Tunisian Crochet with 5 Staff Favorite Patterns eBook today.

Best wishes,

 


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Crochet instructor and designer Kim Guzman provides the stitch basics to get you started, including Tunisian simple stitch, Tunisian purl stitch, and more.

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Comments

DJ Hendricks wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 10:30 AM

Whoops, none of the links to the ebook work!

BarbieB@2 wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 11:20 AM

"Tunisian crochet is much more than a fascinating new crochet stitch".  

Correction: This is not a new crochet stitch, the afghan or tunisian stitch (goes by both names) has been around a long time!

Char55 wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 11:37 AM

Agree with DJ...none of the links to the e-book work!

Toni Rexroat wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 11:52 AM

We currently seem to be having difficulty with the store. We are working on it right now, and I will let you know when it is back up. I'm sorry for the inconvenience.

Toni Rexroat wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 12:06 PM

BarbieB@2, thank you for your comment. I went back and clarified my statement. I love researching crochet techniques, Tunisian crochet is a fascinating study.

Beth D wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 12:29 PM

I love this form of crochet for a whole range of projects! I started with the (typical) potholder/dishcloths in a worsted weight, which have great texture on both sides and do not sag when wet (as many crocheted fabrics do).  I have since moved on to a sweater worked in a DK yarn using a stitch called the Net Stitch, which is completely unlike any other crochet or knit stitch I have ever seen before, and quite lovely.  But I would have to say that what I love most about it is how much easier it is to work with fine yarns. Lace weight and fingering weight yarns have always been a real challenge for me to use, since I have tremors in both hands.  The longer hook and/or the hook and cord add stability to the piece, and are allowing me to explore the creative possibilities with yarns that were impossible for me to work with using a standard crochet hook.  I highly recommend trying this technique.

Toni Rexroat wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 1:10 PM

The store is back up and running! Please let me know if you continue to have problems with the links.

on Apr 26, 2012 1:43 PM

I love using Tunisian crochet!  I am a beginner in crochet, but Tunisian is easy to master, makes small projects quickly, and is great for expirements! Right now I am making a cup cozy using Tunisian simple stich.  Try Tunisian.  You will love it.

twotone wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 6:20 PM

This technique gives me the fabric of knit with the advantage of crochet!  I have tried to knit and I just can not do it.  Using the tunisian technique I get the end result that I am wanting without the frustration of knitting!!  he he

Windy wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 9:11 PM

Thank you for the Tunisian Topic. I have recently fell in love with Tunisian crochet. It's perfect for garmet making.  My favorite Tunisian designer is Amy Depew. I found her on Ravelry.com and she is a genius with Tunisian. I am such a huge fan of hers. I have been following her and am excited to find that she has been published by some crochet magazines. I would love it if you added more articles about Tunisian and featured some of her designs. She really is a genius with Tunisian. Thank you so much!

Sincerely, Windy

Windy wrote
on Apr 26, 2012 9:11 PM

Thank you for the Tunisian Topic. I have recently fell in love with Tunisian crochet. It's perfect for garmet making.  My favorite Tunisian designer is Amy Depew. I found her on Ravelry.com and she is a genius with Tunisian. I am such a huge fan of hers. I have been following her and am excited to find that she has been published by some crochet magazines. I would love it if you added more articles about Tunisian and featured some of her designs. She really is a genius with Tunisian. Thank you so much!

Sincerely, Windy

NoodlesMM wrote
on Jun 19, 2012 7:14 PM

I have looked everywhere to find a Tunisian crochet hook. Is there a specific store that sells them or should i look online for one?

markaty wrote
on Feb 16, 2013 7:16 AM

I want to learn Tunisian crochet but, I'm left handed and don't know how to start. I do every stitch backward in regular crochet. HELP!!!

markaty wrote
on Feb 16, 2013 7:16 AM

I want to learn Tunisian crochet but, I'm left handed and don't know how to start. I do every stitch backward in regular crochet. HELP!!!