Mix and Match: Create Your Own Unique Afghan

Jul 7, 2014

When I look for a crochet afghan pattern to embark on crocheting, I have to ask myself one question, "Will I get bored." It's a flaw I hate to admit to, but I'm sure I am not the only crocheter who struggles with being easily distracted, especially after I have figured out a stitch pattern or design. I've had to force myself to finish the second sleeve because I know I would look funny in a one sleeved cardigan.

 
Jen and Ivo's Wedding Quilt

The size of a crochet blanket intensifies this flaw. That is a lot of fabrics or a large number of squares to finish. Laurinda Reddig to the rescue. Not only does her new book, Reversible Color Crochet, teach a new crochet technique, she also includes 28 afghan blocks that can be mixed and matched to create your own afghan. You can create several of the same blocks, multiples of a few different blocks, or design a sampler afghan where the blocks are never repeated. Laurinda also includes 10 afghan patterns that show innovative ways to combine afghan squares.

 
  Waves Afghan Square

But it isn't just the combination of different blocks that make Laurinda's fun and relatively quick to finish. They are all worked in double or half double crochet. That is where the ingenuity of her crochet intarsia technique comes in. The yarn is not carried along the top of the stitches like with tapestry crochet or carried along the back of the piece to create floats.

Instead individual lengths of yarn are cut and generally wrapped into bobbins. With each color change, you drop the previous color and begin using the next color, picking the previous color back up on the next row. It's actually quite easy.


 
The Games Afoot  

Another great thing about blanket created using afghan blocks is that they make great travel projects. Even if you work them in wool yarn, each square is relatively small and won't be heavy and hot in your lap.

Order or download your copy of Reversible Color Crochet and have your own afghan finished by first snows.

Best wishes,

P.S. Are you easily distracted by new designs when crocheting? Share your tips for finishing projects in the comments.


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Comments

pswap57 wrote
on Jul 7, 2014 10:47 AM

I love doing sampler afghans.  Not only are they interesting to work and display, they are a great way to use up leftover partial skeins of yarn.

randspearson wrote
on Jul 7, 2014 11:03 AM

The Chain Reaction afghan is a great project to stave off boredom. It's also very challenging even to an old pro like me. ;-)

Cass@3 wrote
on Jul 8, 2014 7:34 PM

To relieve the "second sock syndrome" common to socks and sleeves, I work a few rows or one short section of the first sleeve, sock, etc. then stop and work to the same point on the other sleeve, etc.  Then I pick back up with the first item for a few more rows, etc. That way, I don't have a whole other item to do when I finish the first one, just a few rows.  This also helps set the pattern in my mind for the second item, having just learned it for the first.  When I do the whole first item then the second, I've forgotten the start for whatever it is.  Last, this is SO much easier in crochet than in knitting.  Just pull up a long look and your hook is ready to go back and forth between pieces!