Learn to Read Crochet Stitch Diagrams

Jul 30, 2009

Learn to Read Crochet Stitch Diagrams

Crochet is a wonderfully creative process. Because you usually have only one working loop, you can work your next stitch in several different places. Of course, this marvelous feature can make writing or following crochet patterns a challenge. Any one stitch or action can be explained ten different ways (I know because I’ve seen many of them). And crochet definitions vary by country, so a designer from France explains things differently than a designer from, say, Michigan.

This is where a stitch diagram can reduce some of the confusion of written patterns. But first you have to know how to read a stitch diagram. Stitch diagrams use a picture to represent each stitch. These stitch pictures are arranged to illustrate the order of the stitches and their relationship to one another. Stitch diagrams can represent patterns worked in rows or in the round.

Stitch along with me, using the stitch diagram for the Beach Sarong from the Summer 2009 issue. This project uses a fairly simple stitch diagram with a repeat. A stitch diagram is usually shown from only one side—generally the right side. When working in rows, read the right side rows of the stitch diagram from right to left and the wrong side rows from left to right. This method of following stitches back and forth can take a bit of getting used to. A simple trick I use is to always mark the right side of the project to help you remember whether you need to read right to left or left to right for your current row.

Once you can read stitch diagrams, you can create projects even if the directions are in a language you don’t understand. Many Japanese crochet books use stitch diagrams for amigurumi and intricate thread work. I don’t read Japanese, but I can follow the stitch diagrams—provided I already know what stitch each symbol represents and how to form that stitch.

Stitch diagrams are accompanied by a stitch key, but usually not instructions on how to create the stitches. I find it handy to keep a stitch reference book handy. My go-to guide is The Crocheter’s Companion, which includes stitches ranging from single crochet to motifs to Tunisian, as well as finishing techniques and troubleshooting. Particularly helpful is an international stitch symbol chart that gives the British stitch terms, which are different from U.S. stitch terms.

Now, give working from stitch diagrams a whirl. Many patterns use a combination of both or provide both a stitch diagram and written instructions.

   Toni

P.S. Here are a few of my favorite patterns, all of which use stitch diagrams to illustrate design elements from crochet motifs, to crochet cables, to the traditional crocheted pineapple.
 
   
Ruby Cropped Cardi by Robyn Chachula   Atomic Hat by Linda Permann   Bon Vivant Stockings by Brenda K. B. Anderson


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Comments

duckie013 wrote
on Jan 20, 2010 12:20 PM

wow.. ive never seen a stitch diagram before seeing as ive only been crocheting a year and usually find written patterns online but this was really helpful. it looked really complicated at first but i think i understand it now

JunSulaiman wrote
on Oct 14, 2010 9:33 PM

I've been crocheting using this Japanese diagram before..and I found it is really easy to understand...Now I started to study on how to crochet using written pattern..a bit hard for me..but hope I can learn faster by using your ebook.. :D

zoomiejr wrote
on Jul 27, 2012 10:19 AM

Stitch Diagrams!  Always stitch diagrams.

I am self-taught, and I was able to learn, because I could easily "read" the patterns, and how each stitch connected to the other stitches helped me understand how to crochet.

Personally, I think that it's so easy for a written pattern to accidentally have massive mistakes--dropped lines of directions, stitches out of order, and so on.  In my opinion, it's a bit harder to mess up instructions in a drawn stitch diagram, because I think it's more noticeable that there is a problem with what is drawn for the pattern.

I find it so easy to get confused when reading a written pattern--having to translate abbreviations, keep track of order of operations, and how this fits into the previous row, oh! and not to let my eye slide down to another row (line marker systems, be damned!).  

I generally won't even bother with attempting to make a project that has directions only, and I get super excited when I find a diagrammed project!  (I do a mental fist pump, and sub-vocal "Yesss!").  I have decided that I will pretty much avoid directions only patterns; magazines; books; projects, instead I will purchase those which have stitch diagrams.  In this little way, I am attempting to let those "powers that be" know that it is beyond time for "them" to reach out to ALL crocheters and provide "full service" patterns.

abtcwt71 wrote
on Jul 28, 2012 11:21 AM

I use both written and diagram.  When the written doesn't make sense I use the diagram and vice versa.

awecheech wrote
on Sep 4, 2012 2:31 PM

Right off the bat there's no symbol in the legend for the XXXXXXXXXX along the bottom above the chain. Frustrating.

Toni Rexroat wrote
on Sep 5, 2012 1:49 PM

Hi awcheech,

The X is the symbol for a single crochet. The single crochet, as in the key, can also be represented as a +. That is the only stitch I have seen that is not agreed uon and sometimes different between stitch diagrams.

AuntieLoBug wrote
on Jan 27, 2014 4:12 PM

I have a diagram and it shows, what looks to me like an upside down teardrop. what is that stitch?  Pls email me the info at Lo_Bug@hotmail.com ty.

AuntieLoBug wrote
on Jan 27, 2014 4:13 PM

I have a diagram and it shows, what looks to me like an upside down teardrop. what is that stitch?  Pls email me the info at Lo_Bug@hotmail.com ty.