The Best of Interweave Crochet

Jul 11, 2011

A note from Toni: Since 2004, Interweave Crochet, has offered designs with inventive constructions, modern uses of historic techniques, and innovative designs since its creation. Now the best twenty designs have been compiled in one book. But how do you choose the top projects? Interweave Crochet editor Marcy Smith let us in on how she chose the patterns for this comprehensive compilation.

— Toni

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Long before I became the editor of Interweave Crochet, I was an avid fan of the magazine. I found myself continually amazed by the many ways hook and yarn could meet to create innovative designs.

So it was with both awe and trepidation that I approached the task of selecting the best of Interweave Crochet's designs to put together in a single book.


At the top of the list, of course, was the blanket that launched a thousand crochet hooks: the Babette Blanket (below left), by color genius Kathy Merrick. You'll also find Lily Chin's Lace Dress (at left), guest of honor at many crocheters' special events. Also included is Julia Vaconsin's Northern Dreams Pullover (below right), which marries fine yarn with clever stitching to create a classic sweater with modern detailing, and Kristin Omdahl's Infinity Wrap, which uses basic math to create an infinitely clever motif.


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Some of the projects, such as Kim Guzman's Luna Sweater, feature a new crochet stitch pattern, some are new conceptions of established designs, as with the iconic Babette Blanket, which takes the Granny square to new levels. Robyn Chachula's Rosemary Sweater, Julia Vaconsin's Big Bow Sweater, and Chloe Nightingale's Seafoam Vest, among others, feature unconventional construction, a hallmark of the crochet garments in Interweave Crochet. Tunisian crochet, all the rage today, appeared in Interweave Crochet's very first stand-alone issue in 2004 with Kathleen Power Johnson's Tunisian Vest, included here. And Carol Ventura's brilliant tapestry crochet is represented with her Diamonds Silk Scarf, worked in two different yarn weights.


Individually, the projects provide an exploration into the possibilities of crochet. Together, these projects represent the kind of crochet that has come to define Interweave Crochet: bold, innovative, and of course, very wearable. These designs fit into your lifestyle as easily today as they did when they first appeared.

   
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In addition, throughout the book, you'll find several of our Beyond the Basics and Back to Basics columns to help you master crochet techniques and refine your projects. Pre-order The Best of Interweave Crochet today and enjoy your crochet exploration.


Best,




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Comments

cookie23 wrote
on Jul 25, 2011 1:44 PM

on that iterweave it doesn't say how many you chain at the end of a row.  I'm not getting the meaning when  it says work  in the back. I need to see where the hook is going on this point. I tried it and it doesn't look like the design.

mullel1@verizon.net

Toni Rexroat wrote
on Aug 4, 2011 3:44 PM

Hi,

You will notice with Interweave patterns that the number chained is not given at the end of the row but at the beginning of the next row. This is because that chain becomes a stitch of the next row.

I'm not sure what you mean by the back. Do you mean the back loop of the stitch or the back of the actual project?