Edging a Baby Dress with Crochet Lace

Jul 5, 2012

When Sharon mentioned that she wanted to start a crochet-along based on the crochet edgings in the Interweave Crochet Summer 2012 issue, I immediately claimed the Bruges Border by Natasha Robarge. I fell in love with the rippling grace of this crochet lace when it arrived in-house for photography.

As I began working the curves of this crochet lace, I fell more and more in love with it. The completed edging is worked in three sections. First you work the curved middle section. Because the lace is worked horizontally, meaning from end to end not top to bottom, you can keep crocheting until you reach your desired length. You don't have to worry about making sure your beginning chain is the correct length.

I didn't fasten off at the end of the middle section and used a second ball of thread to begin working the top band. This band really determined how long I could block the lace. But because the middle section was not fastened off, if the lace is a little short you can just work a few more rows.

Finally, the picot row is worked. This row is the icing on the cake, completing the elegant look.

I offered to make enough lace for the hem of my niece's dress. I only had about two weeks, but I figure that was easily doable. It couldn't be more than thirty or forty inches, right? It was seventy inches.

Then "If You Give a Mouse a Cookie" syndrome set in. For those of you who haven't read the children's book, a mouse is given a cookie, and then he decides he needs milk, then a napkin, and so on.

My mother was sewing the dress, and when she saw the gorgeous lace, she decided we needed lace for the sleeves as well. So I whipped up eleven inches per sleeve. Okay, I didn't quite "whip" it up, but I was surprised how quickly the Bruces Border can be crocheted.

The sleeve lace led to a quick bit of picot lace for the neckline, and the picot lace around the neckline let to a delicate little flower.

I love the way the crochet lace on this dress turned out. I am already planning on making more lace for myself.

Have you crocheted the Bruges Lace or any of the other lace edging in the Summer 2012 issue?

Best wishes,


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Interweave Crochet, Summer 2012 (Digital Edition)

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Looking for crochet patterns that echo current trends? Lacy cover-ups are perfect for poolside or parties. Retro stripes grace crochet tops and dresses. Explore Turkish edgings and adorn garments and home decor with crocheted edgings. Maire Treanor's series on Clones lace continues with motifs for leaves and a winsome scroll.

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Comments

mandyangela wrote
on Jul 8, 2012 3:40 PM

Welcome to the world, little lady!!  And well done to your Mom and yourself - beautiful work!