What Can You Do With a Panel

Apr 21, 2014

Join as you go crochet, what can I do with that technique? My first thought is just motifs and ribbing, but there are so many more possibilities. Lily Chin, a well-known designer and all-around amazing crocheter, has shared some of her best techniques, tips, and ideas in her newest crochet video workshop, Join As You Go with Lily Chin.

After watching her workshop I am full of ideas. Here are a few of my favorites!

 
 
 
You can eliminate seaming. Even if a cardigan pattern directs you to work the back and two fronts separately, you can work them in one piece by crocheting the fronts of a cardigan directly into the back. This method not only removes the need to seam the pieces together but also the bulk of those seams.   Turn your piece, joining into the top, bottom, or either side to create unique colorwork designs. This design includes panels worked in different colors, in varying widths, and in varying directions to create a deceptively simple vest.
 
 
 
 Joining narrows panels worked in variegated yarns can create a gorgeous fabric without the color pooling that can occur. The panels create their own textural element and highlight the color change, but the join as you go technique means you won't have to seam the panels together.   I am in love with Lily's afghan! Rather than using crochet intartsia or tapestry crochet, this classic design is created using panels that are joined as you crochet them. Watching the pattern appear as you work each panel is exciting as well.
 

I am enthralled with possibilities of joining as you go and thrilled at the idea of eliminating seaming. Discover what you can create. Order Join As You Go with Lily Chin today!

Best wishes,

P.S. Do you have your own tips for joining as you crochet? Share them in the comments.


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Comments

Char55 wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 9:45 AM

Absolutely LOVE the play of colors in the variegated narrow strips shown in the article! Also love the idea of not having to join the strips individually. Had used this type of joining for ribbing and borders but had not considered it for panels...GREAT IDEA!