Prayer Shawl

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Countrihart wrote
on Jul 10, 2010 1:56 PM

This is a pretty easy triangular shawl to make. It's on the Lion's Brand site, along with several other great shawl patterns. I've shared this pattern with members in my prayer shawl group, who seem to like it as well. It calls for one color solid yarn, but I used one solid for the center of the shawl then used up some of my old  matching ombre yarn to make an edge all around. You start at the bottom tip of the triangle and work up, so you can make it as wide as you'd like following the increase instructions in the pattern. Good Luck!

 

 

Simply Sublime Shawl

Lion Brand® Homespun® 
 (can use Red Heart Super Saver Yarn  approx 14 ounces)

SKILL LEVELEasy

SIZE: One Size
About 35 x 64 in. (89 x 162.5 cm)

Crochet hook size;  K

GAUGE:

10 hdc + 9 rows = 4 in. (10 cm) BE SURE TO CHECK YOUR GAUGE. When you match the gauge in a pattern, your project will be the size specified in the pattern and the materials specified in the pattern will be sufficient. If it takes you fewer stitches and rows to make a 4 in. [10 cm] square, try using a smaller size hook or needles; if more stitches and rows, try a larger size hook or needles.

 

SHAWL
Ch 3.
Row 1: Work 2 hdc in 3rd ch from hook.
Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as hdc and ch 1, here and throughout), Turn, 2 hdc in 1st hdc, hdc in next hdc, ch 1, hdc in top of t-ch  =  5 hdc and 2 ch-1 sps.
Row 3: Ch 3, turn, hdc in 1st ch-1 sp, 2 hdc in next hdc, hdc in each of next 2 hdc, ch 1, hdc in last ch-1 sp = 7 hdc and 2 ch-1 sps.
Row 4: Ch 3, turn, hdc in 1st ch-1 sp, 2 hdc in next hdc, hdc in each hdc across to last ch-1 sp, ch-1, hdc in last ch-1 sp = 9 hdc and 2 ch-1 sps.
Repeat Row 4,  until piece measures 35 in. from beginning.
Fasten off.

FINISHIING
Weave in ends.


 

Jan

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Theresea2 wrote
on Aug 2, 2010 10:04 PM

Howdy Jan, Coffee

Just wanted to say thanks for the pattern, I finished it and it work out well and fast.  It ended up being to small for my intended person, me.  But, it fits my sister -in-law's mother to a tee and the timing couldn't have been any better.  She just lost one of her daughters to a heartattack, she was just 44 and healthy.. or so we thought.  She really appreicated the prayer shawl.

Thanks again,

Theresee,Right Hug - you just never know how something you pass on will beccome useful.

Theresee Coffee

.... never without a coffee, never without a hook...

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Countrihart wrote
on Aug 3, 2010 6:20 PM

Hello Theresee,

I'm so glad to hear that the shawl pattern came in handy for you. I love to share things that I myself like, with others. As you also mentioned, you never know when it will become useful to someone else.  I hope the shawl offers much comfort to your sister-in-law's mother. Knowing that it was hand made by you, will certainly make her feel your caring spirit. 

God Bless you all!

~Janet~  Smile

Jan

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on Sep 13, 2010 9:39 PM

Hi you shawl enthusiasts!

I did a one skein shawl this summer --and yes my skein was big! About 300 yds of a medium-bulky, nice-feeling acrylic that was variegated in jewel tones. I used a big hook (a P--I really love those plastic big hooks!) and did a simple double crochet lace--the pattern I repeated was one i found in Margaret Hubert's must-have book, "The Complete Photo Guide to Crochet." What's great about this book is it lends itself so well to making your own designs to fit your needs. I made my shawl about 60" long and 14" wide, so it was more of a stole. I didn't do the fringe thing. The result was a very elegant-looking "exploded lace" type of look. So easy!!

Dragonflychick

celebrating every day  Cake

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Pamela Schad wrote
on Sep 14, 2010 3:17 PM

I'm looking for prayer shawls to donate to charity, but so far all of the books I've bought that have prayer shawl patterns pretty much use expensive yarns and I am on disability and can't really afford those yarns. Does anyone know where there are any links for free prayer shawl patterns that are made with worste weight yarn, like Red Heart Super Saver? Thanks so much for any help!!

Pam Schad, crochetingkitty@yahoo.com

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on Sep 14, 2010 7:16 PM

Hi Pam:

The prayer shawls that I do are all made with acrylic yarns that are not expensive. I have found great sales at JoAnn's fabrics, both in-store and online in cozy and attractive acrylics and wools. They feature the Lion Brand yarns (among others), and frequently there are good deals on a closeout color and one can pick up a few skeins that way. There are also other brands there that are always inexpensive, like many of the classic Red Heart cottons and acrylics, such as you mentioned.

My friend just bought a very large box of excellent wool yarn in worsted weight from ebay for a very low price, so there is another avenue.

There are so many free patterns through both the Red Heart and Lion Brand websites. Also, there ought to be some more creative patterns through this interweave family of sites, here and at knittingdaily.com

And, you can always substitute yarns from your patterns and use the less expensive yarns. Guage doesn't much matter with a shawl anyway.

Hope that helps!

dragonflychick

celebrating every day  Cake

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PattyH@14 wrote
on Dec 19, 2010 8:59 PM

Hi Theresa.

  Im new to the group here. It all looks so exciting. Im new to doing shawls also. How do you do a half granny square shawl? Sounds simple enough, Could you help me please.  thank you.  patty

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crafty4life wrote
on Jan 22, 2011 2:08 PM

Hi,

I'm new to the site--

I make shawls in a rectangle and vary the size based on who I am making it for. 

I use size K hook usually (although have used J also), and like the Lion Brand Homespun yarn the best for it.  Typically I use about 2 1/2 - 3 skeins depending how long I want to make it.  The super saver yarns would work well for this also.  "I Love this Yarn" by Red Heart is at Hobby Lobby and it is a little softer and good prices-plus use the 40% off coupon.  The pounder yarns work well too.

Chain stitch the width that you want your shawl to be.  I usually make it about 15-18" long so it's substantial-but do what you're comfortable with.   (Keep in mind that the wider it is, the longer it hangs between your neck and center back.)

When done with chain stitches; turn work, and half-double crochet (hdc) in the second chain from hook. Hdc in every stitch across.  At end of row, turn work, chain 2 and hdc in each stitch across. Repeat to desired length.

You can do a variation of many colors to use scraps as well.  Or-I haven't tried this yet--but have been thinking to start it with a few small granny squares lined up, and then doing the hdc's across for the rest of the shawl, and ending it with a few small granny squares again. Maybe a few charms added into the fringe, or some beads would be fun :)

Fringe is optional too-it would look great with or without it.

Enjoy!Big Smile

Laura  crafty4life@yahoo.com

 

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craftivista wrote
on Apr 1, 2011 6:02 AM

Hi there!


I'm bumping this thread to see if any of you prayer shawl makers might have a minute to share some words with me about crocheting prayer shawls.

I'm Betsy Greer and working on the next Craftivism column for Interweave Crochet, and would really love to have your voices included regarding what makes prayer shawls worth creating.

If you have thoughts on the general process, they would be wonderful to hear (and possibly use)! I know there are many great thoughts on this thread!

Alternatively, answers to one/all of these questions would be wonderful!

*How did you start making prayer shawls?

*Who do you make them for?

*How do you pass them along when you give them? (Ie, wrap them up, post them, etc)

 

Thanks so much, and keep making those shawls! :)

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Countrihart wrote
on Apr 1, 2011 7:47 PM

Hi Betsy!

About 2 yrs ago, the Pastor of my church was approached by one of the chaplains in a Manhattan based hospital, who presented the idea of starting a Prayer Shawl group in our Parish. She said many of the patients there faced their illnesses alone and could really use some comfort - not just the physical warmth of the shawl, but the spiritual and emotional comfort of knowing there are people 'out there' who care and are praying for them.  So our little group was born.  We are small with just about 7 active crocheters, but we produce many items, from shawls to decorative prayer squares in which the patients can hold on to while they  pray.  Our pieces are collected every 3 months, and blessed by one of our priests at Sunday Mass, then delivered to the hospital.

We have received wonderful letters from the hospital staff, telling us how these patients react to receiving these items. Many wrap themselves in the shawl and don't want to take it off. Their attitude changes for the better, calming their fears and anxieties, we are told. I, myself have made many variations, always changing patterns, and color combinations.  Our group recently received a plaque from the hospital, which hangs in the Parish Center,  acknowledging and thanking us for our  contributions.  It's a wonderful feeling to know that the products of my crochet hobby, can brighten up another person's life and offer comfort to them during their health situation.  I think I'll go finish up another shawl now!  Big Smile

Jan

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craftivista wrote
on Apr 2, 2011 10:44 PM

Jan, thanks so much for your answers and your inspiring thoughts!!

You definitely highlighted reasons why both the recipient and the maker can benefit from the process of crocheting prayer shawls/squares! It's always so inspiring to hear how recipients view/benefit/are using these items, especially that they can help ease fears and anxieties... such important things when you're dealing with hard times!

It's so easy to forget when we're "out here" that there are so many individuals who could use a little crocheted item (square) or a big one (shawl) to keep with them to remember that others are thinking of them and their wellbeing.

Thanks for taking a moment to share your thoughts, and I'm sure that prayer shawl you're working on is looking good!

 

 

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sm28 wrote
on Apr 12, 2011 9:48 AM

I just finished three shawls for my church and am working on some prayer squares to give to the congregation this weekend so they can see what our ministry is doing.  I just used a simple granny square out of varigated yarn and did 10 squares with 3 rows and then I did a dc trim all the way around in a solid color and put fringe on both ends.  It only took about 2 1/2 skeins and I had it done in no time.  I adjust the squares and make some longer and some shorter.  They looked beautiful.  My first every shawl I kept for myself (due to some mistakes) and it does comfort you when you need that little one on one time.

 

 

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craftivista wrote
on Apr 17, 2011 8:00 PM

sm28, 

How great that you're using the prayer squares as a way to advertise what you've been up to! What an excellent way of showing that it doesn't have to be something big, just something to comfort others. And, yep, I bet those squares did look beautiful!

Thanks so much for sharing your experiences with prayer shawls!

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pattyb1 wrote
on Apr 29, 2011 7:13 AM

Hi Craftivista,  I found this thread while watching "The Royal Wedding", anyway, to answer your questions, several years ago a goup of ladies at church began meeting to make items for charity.  Prayer Shawls were one of the projects.  We chose whatever pattern (knit or crochet).  I made several basic ones in a smaller size.  Jump forward to last August, a very dear friend of mine was facing hip replacement surgery.  She lives more than a hour drive away & I couldn't be with her as often as I would have liked.  I found a pattern on a website and made the shawl in her fav color.  I made it quite long so that she could wrap it around her and still have length to cover her legs.  I mailed it with a note that as she wrapped herself in the shawl, she would be wrapping my love and prayers around her.  Unforunately, she passed several months later from a different illness.  Her family gave me the shawl back & now I feel her arms and love around me.  Hope this helps.

Make everyday a day to Crochet!

Patty

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