Working around the post: Exploring raised double crochets

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on Nov 29, 2006 6:25 PM
Crochet generally produces a fabric with interesting surface texture. Many stitch patterns have been developed to further increase this quality. An easy way to give your crocheted fabric plenty of texture is to use raised double crochets, which are generally referred to in patterns as front post double crochet (FPdc) and back post double crochet (BPdc).

An ”ordinary” double crochet is worked into the top of the stitch in the previous row. A raised double crochet is worked around the ”post” of the stitch (i.e. around the body of the stitch).


A front post double crochet will pop out in front of the fabric.


Start by working a row or two of ordinary double crochet.


Now, let’s make a FPdc. Yarn over as usual, then insert the hook around the post of the stitch in the row below, going from the front around the back and out at the front again. See how this already pushes the stitch to the front of the fabric?


Front Post Double Crochet 


Yarn over and pull up a loop.


Front Post Double Crochet 


Work the loops on the hook as usual. Voilà, you’ve made a FPdc.


Front Post Double Crochet 


A couple of ”ordinary” stitches more, and you can really see how the raised double crochet stands out from the bottom fabric.


Front Post Double Crochet 


A BPdc is worked the other way around. Since the relief happens at the back of the fabric, it’s a shy stitch which doesn’t lend itself well to photography. Work it as above, only when inserting your hook around the stitch in the row below, insert it from the back of the fabric, go around the stitch at the front and out at the back again.


This discrete fellow looks like this when completed; the horizontal bar is the stitch from the previous row, and behind it, the BPdc is hiding.


Back Post Double Crochet 


These two stitches really mirror each other. To create a ridge of raised double crochets, you use FPdc on the right side of the fabric, and BPdc on the wrong side.


Vertical RibHere's how we can use them:


A common stitch pattern with raised double crochet is a vertical rib pattern, which I have seen used in many a pattern for crocheted sweaters.


The first row is all ordinary double crochet. On the second row, alternate 1 FPdc and 1 BPdc across the row. On following rows, the stitches are worked as they appear: a protruding stitch is worked as a FPdc, a receding stitch as a BPdc.


Another stitch pattern in allover raised double crochet is the basketweave pattern:


Basketweave PatternIn this swatch, squares of 4 rows and 4 stitches are worked alternately in raised double crochets and in receding double crochets.


Both of these patterns result in a highly structured, interesting fabric. It should be noted, though, that any pattern worked entirely in raised double crochet will yield a very thick fabric. For many items, as well as for well chosen details in clothing, this will work as a charm. However, a complete garment in basketweave stitch would need to be worked in very thin yarn in order to be wearable.


If you’re looking for a softer, thinner fabric, mixing raised double crochets with other stitches is the solution.


Raised trebles over a background of single crochetIn the swatch to the right, raised treble crochets run vertically over a background of single crochets.


It’s interesting to note that only FPdcs are used in this pattern, which also contributes to a thinner fabric.


I’ve borrowed this stitch pattern from a design by Jane Snedde Peever. If you’re interested in patterns in which textured stitches run over a solid background (often in a much more intricate way than in this simple example), it’s worth taking a look at her books ”Crocheted Aran Sweaters” and ”More Crocheted Aran Sweaters”.


One of my favourite ways to use raised double crochets is to underline shapes and lines in lacey patterns. If the yarn and hook are carefully chosen, the openness of the lace will compensate for the thickness of the raised stitches, and it all comes together in a beautiful, useful fabric.


LaceOne example of this is the stitch pattern used in the popular Short’n’Sweet jacket, designed by Angela ”La Vonne” Best and published in the book The Happy Hooker by Debbie Stoller.


The picture (at right) shows a detail of my interpretation of this pattern, worked in a thinner yarn (DMC Senso) and with a smaller hook than the original.


See how the raised stitches underline the shapes in the pattern? Lovely.


And here's yet another example where raised stitches create strong vertical lines that add both order and texture to the diagonal puffiness (see photo below).


Vertical Lines 


Take a look at your favourite stitch patterns and see where you think you could put in some raised stitches to give them even more impact. Pull out your hook and yarn and go play!


http://www.annettepetavy.com

Not Ranked
Posts 2
on Apr 8, 2014 12:07 PM

Annette,

 

I cannot see the pictures in your post. Could you either send them to me or repost?\

 

Thank you.

Kayla 

Not Ranked
Posts 2
on Apr 8, 2014 12:07 PM

Annette,

 

I cannot see the pictures in your post. Could you either send them to me or repost?

 

Thank you.

Kayla 

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