starting a row in navajo afghan

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yarnhabit1 wrote
on Jul 30, 2008 10:27 PM


Hello ... Crochet Me is such a good site -- I have been visiting for awhile -- and as a newcomer to this sneaky addiction, I am hoping someone here can help me out with my question. I must be having a brain cramp as I can not make any sense of what to do to start each row in this pattern that has intrigued me (so, kind of a fundamental problem!). I've reproduced the beginning instructions below. It's a vintage pattern (public domain) found at http://www.knitting-crochet.com/crochet/navindmulcol.html and is presumably written for experienced crocheters, so some of the basic instructions are not spelled out. Each row is made separately, cutting the yarn, and without turning the work (always starting from the right side), so a 4" tail of yarn is left at start and finish of each row for a fringe. I can get a lovely knot at the END (left) of each row, but I can't get the beginning to start off as nicely. Can someone suggest how to start the rows? I've also reproduced below the advice given by someone who "makes a lot of these afghans," but again it presumes more knowledge than I actually have. By the way, the pattern does look nifty, and is pretty simple, once I get past the startup! Thanks for taking time to read this.



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[from pattern:]  Note: Each Row is worked separately; the ending of each row is the same as the beginning of the pattern. Do not turn, leave a 4" end of yarn at the start and end of each row for fringe.

All single crochets [sc] are made in back lps of sts.

All double crochets [dc] are made in front lps of sts in second Row from one being worked on.

Start with black for border. Ch 245 and break yarn. [285 for 72" x 52" size]

Border:

Rows 1-5: Sc in each st across with border color [black]. [etc, etc; following rows create raised diamond pattern]



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 [someone's advice, for first row after foundation chain:]  "Pull out a piece of yarn to 4" ... then make a loop in your yarn at that point, stick your needle through the loop, then thru the fitst stitch on the chain; work off both loops for your first sc.  Mark the first stitch ... if you aren't sure you can crochet over the loopo to keep it from unraveling, using your hook as a guide, tie your yarn around it and make a knot, so that you have a secure loop. "



[for further rows:]  "go back to the beginning, and tie your yarn into a loop as before and make a sc in the first sc, and work each row just as you did this one."  [I don't get it!]


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PaulineL wrote
on Jul 31, 2008 10:17 AM

You know the slip knot you make to start a chain? Make one to start each row, too, with a 4" tail, and you'll have a secure knot at the beginning of each row.


Make the slip knot, then insert your hook into the first stitch, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw loop thru two loops - sc made. The two loops are the loop in the stitch below and the slip knot.


I think that's what 'someone's advice' was trying to say, but she(?) used a simple loop, not a slip knot.


HTH,

Pauline


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yarnhabit1 wrote
on Jul 31, 2008 9:26 PM

Pauline, thanks so much ... a slipknot makes perfect sense. I have been going crazy trying to start with a 'simple loop' and losing my starting sc, etc., even trying to deconstruct my ending stitch and do it in reverse at the beginning of the row (what??) but I think you're right and it was just a slip between the keyboard and the brain, as they say (or so they say they say...). The advice was a comment that Googled itself up from some archive on some website out there, and was the only one that specifically addressed the 'starting up' topic. Anyways, I think at this point I will start all over -- only a few rows done so far, all part of the learning curve; with your advice, I will be able to start my new resolution to start and end well. Thanks again.


peace, yarnhabit


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PaulineL wrote
on Aug 1, 2008 6:54 PM

Glad to help. Now, to confuse things, I realize you CAN start with a semi-simple loop but the tail has to be caught in the process. I often start a chain by holding the yarn in my left hand, as usual, and pointing the crochet hook at myself, doing a yo, and chaining into the yo so there is no lumpy knot at the beginning. Better than that I cannot describe it. Use the slip knot unless you are able to figure out what I'm talking about.


That's a nice pattern you're working on. Go girl!


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mommatrain wrote
on Sep 5, 2008 11:44 AM
Help With navajo afghan Please!!!!

Starting a row in navajo afghan was just the start of my problems for me in this pattern. This pattern was my mother-in-laws signature afghan, she passed in June and now hubby would like me to crochet him one. I am not a beginner but I am not very experienced either. I have restarted 4 times and I am kinda tired of chaining and counting 285 if you know what I mean lol.

First what does "break yarn" in (Start with black for border. Ch 245 and break yarn) and when "All double crochets [dc] are made in front lps of sts in second Row from one being worked on. When this stich falls on a previous dc where exactly are you supposed to lp the stitch?

Please share any info on this pattern...


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yarnhabit1 wrote
on Sep 14, 2008 12:38 AM

O yes, I feel your pain about restarting, this pattern leaves so much unsaid -- I spent quite a while experimenting with various interpretations of the instructions, restarting, etc etc. I'll try uploading three photos of where I have got to at this point, as you may see something I've learned (or something I'm doing wrong!)


NavAfgStart


NavAfgVertical


NavAfgWSRS


So, assuming the photos do come up, courtesy of Flickr, I can attempt to answer your 2 questions.

(1) "Break" yarn -- why can't they just say "cut"? That's what you do following your last sc in row: measure a 4" tail (or whatever length you like) for a fringe, cut the yarn and catch it with your hook and tie off (your end-knot). Is that what you meant?

(2) I Googled a couple of discussions about which row is the "second row from the one you're working on" and tried a couple of experiments myself. Here is what I worked out, see if it makes sense: let's say you have done the first 5 rows for the border, starting each row at the right-hand end (RS) with a new strand of yarn, making a slipknot and doing sc in the back (top) loop of each preceding row as you go. In row 6 you have done 2 sc in the back (top) loops of st1 and st2 of row 5; then your first dc will be made in the front loop of st 3, row 4. When your dc is complete, st 4 of row 5 is skipped and your next row 6 sc is in st 5, row 5 --- etc, etc. I really hope that makes sense to you. It is easy to slip back into regular sc, catching both loops in the preceding row, and I had to undo two rows at one point. The uncaught "front/bottom" loops made nice ridges in the rows on RS. Finally getting to your question, when you reach the point in the pattern where one dc is directly above another (the junction of two diamonds), they are two rows apart, and you will find the front loop of the stitch you created on RS by doing your dc right where you want it, to anchor your new dc. In my stash-busting Red Heart acrylic, the two dcs almost touch and frame a black dc at the tip of each diamond. As an example, in row 15 (white) (yes, it's pink in my effort) the dc is made in front loop of row 13 (white/pink) and sc in back loop of row 14; there is a single row (16) of black, then row 17 (repeats row 15) makes dc in front loop, row 15 and sc in back loop, row 16, etc etc. Sorry if I'm overstating it, it seems to be working out -- although I find the fabric rather stiff and heavy (maybe that will improve with blocking) and I have just discovered it's 66" long instead of 60" -- sigh. Good luck!


Cheers,

yarnhabit


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mommatrain wrote
on Sep 14, 2008 9:19 AM

Thank you so much for replying, I am ready to pull my hair out, by husband is now begging to just start a new pattern, my children now believe their afgans won't be started untill they have grandchildren, they are 11 and 14, lol. seriously I got pretty far but my diamonds (lines) some were good some were whacky, so for one last time I pulled it all out up to line 6 I just printed your reply and pictures (beautiful I must add) and I will start with the guidence of what you wrote. Thank you so much I am so happy I found crochet me and others that have had problems with this pattern too.


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yarnhabit1 wrote
on Sep 14, 2008 6:02 PM

Good to hear that your children will not have to wait for years and years (LOL) I am not sure how soon my own project will be done, at 2 or 3 rows a day! ... I don't know which pattern (or patterns) you are using, but did you also deduce that there is always one more dc and a number of scs at the left end of each row, after your last pattern repeat? In other words, the heritage pattern I first found and printed out showed no stitches at the end of each row following the last repeat of the pattern in [ ], so the number of stitches per row would never add up to 245 (or 285); another pattern I found did add these stitches to the instructions for each row. So they would be, for example, Row 7: 3sc, 1dc, [17sc, 1dc, 1sc, 1dc], 17sc, 1dc, 3sc; Row 8: 4sc, 1dc, [15sc, 1dc, 3sc,1dc], 15sc, 1dc, 4sc etc. etc. Well I wish you good luck and hope your husband will like his great new afghan (probably with a bit less pink than mine, I'm guessing)! Cheers.


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magsterone wrote
on Sep 20, 2009 8:59 PM

Where did you get the navajo afghan pattern?


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magsterone wrote
on Sep 20, 2009 9:23 PM
Dah I found it. How would you go about making it smaller for a child?

magsterone


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kimmykimjo1 wrote
on Oct 3, 2009 5:47 PM

Where is the instruction for the black stripe in the gray, white & red blocks?


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kimmykimjo1 wrote
on Oct 3, 2009 6:39 PM

ok...the black stripe doesnt begin until row 16, figured it out. :)


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