Selling your crochet

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bindudotcom wrote
on Nov 2, 2010 6:31 AM

I am just wondering, did anybody has any success in selling crocheted items. Any suggestions are appreciated. Silk yarn or cotton items moving well?

Thanks for suggestions.

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Shellie2355 wrote
on Nov 2, 2010 8:25 AM

I haven't gotten into selling my crochet work per se, I've done a few things on commission and taken token payment for them. A lot of co-workers have suggested that I set up an Etsy shop to sell my crochet work, but that seems like it would take the fun out of crocheting for me (if I had to maintain an inventory of items).

You may want to check out the Etsy shops and see what they're selling and for how much.

Shellie Dunn
Somonauk, IL
http://4evercrochet.blogspot.com

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bindudotcom wrote
on Nov 2, 2010 8:31 AM

Thanks for the suggestion Shellie. I have seen people are listed wash clothes and stuff like that. I am not sure they are moving or not. Did your co-workers buy anything from you? Or they are just suggesting you can sell?  I heard of people suggesting others to sell, while they have no interest in buying from the artisan.

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Shellie2355 wrote
on Nov 2, 2010 8:51 AM

Actually, both!Smile

I've sold a couple of washcloths, been commissioned (completed and accepted payment) to make a "Convertible Cowl" in bulky yarn for a co-worker (the cowl pulls up into a hood). And have been commissioned to make a scarf, but am awaiting the yarn (I have the purchaser buy the yarn for color choices and softness, but I always suggest lower cost yarns, so as not to cut into my payment). I also have had a few people interested in my hats, but so far, no one has specifically arranged to purchase one.

 

I don't solicit projects, but I always show off my latest creations. (This was a joint effort to brighten up our office -- my co-worker supplied the yarn and wreath).

I do have some cotton thread earrings for sale in an upscale hand-made shop near our local university, but so far, I haven't sold any. Those were easy to make (about 20 minutes for a pair), so I took the plunge and tried the retail thing. To me, this was a fun side project, but I don't think I'll continue with this venture.

All in all, I think the economy is such that selling hand made items is difficult right now. That's why I let my work speak for itself and once in a while will take on a project if payment is guaranteed.

Hope this helps.

Shellie Dunn
Somonauk, IL
http://4evercrochet.blogspot.com

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bindudotcom wrote
on Nov 2, 2010 10:55 AM

That is pretty good.Congrats!

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on Nov 2, 2010 1:02 PM

I've been an Etsy shop "owner" for a couple years now, specializing in amigurumi crochet dolls. My shop and I are closing in on 360 sales, plus I do a couple shows a year.

If you want to get into selling crochet, my advice is this. DON'T DO IT FOR THE MONEY. There is NO money whatsoever in crochet. I recently wrote a rebuttal to Etsy's pricing suggestion in my blog ( http://itsybitsyspidercrochet.blogspot.com/2010/11/mini-monday-rant.html ) where I did the math on one of my items. To make even minimum wage, I would have to list an item that I usually can't sell for more than $7.00 for almost $25. Now that estimate is just materials and labor... you still have to figure in Etsy's fees, PayPal's fees, the US government's take... you get the idea.

By my calculations, I make roughly $1.50 an hour on crochet -- and that's before taxes and fees.

Long story short, if you're looking for a way to get rid of some finished projects and want to try a little adventure in business, by all means -- go ahead. Keep in mind though that you're not going to be able to quit your day job any time soon if all you offer is finished crochet projects.

I personally keep my shop open on Etsy because it's been a great way to meet like-minded crafters and because I'm working on publishing/selling my patterns.

Hope this helps a little!

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bindudotcom wrote
on Nov 24, 2010 12:20 PM

Thanks for the information. I will be checking your blog. Since you have a shop on Etsy, if I do give a link to your shop and blog in my blog as well as my website, will it be helpful to you? Please let me know. 

If anything I can do to help you to get more business, please let me know. I will be glad to do so. 

www.bindu.ca

http://whateverdreams.blogspot.com/

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joyenglish wrote
on Nov 26, 2010 1:18 AM

Thanks for that straight forward post. I recently took an online class that was supposed to be about how to start a crochet business. Most of the people signed up were wanting to sell finished products. No one ever got real about the fact that you can't just sell your own stuff if you want to have a serious business. More people should be honest about that. If you want to start a business there are different ways to do it, but just selling your own stuff is not one of them. 

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bindudotcom wrote
on Nov 26, 2010 9:35 AM

Thanks for the reply. There are online courses on selling everything. That is a business to make money. Now I think,what you are all saying is, selling your crochet work is not a business at all. 

Thanks for that information. Making patterns, teaching crochet, selling yarn etc can be a business. But not the crocheted stuff. Nice information to know from fellow crocheters. 

http://bindu.ca

http://whateverdreams.blogspot.com/

 

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bindudotcom wrote
on Dec 20, 2010 2:24 PM

Thanks for the reply. People tell me that I am talented and they like the things I make. So, may be not that great to sell.

Thanks for your time.

Bindu

www.bindu.ca

 

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joyenglish wrote
on Dec 20, 2010 8:52 PM

Puretravel makes a good point. You can make money selling your own handmade items if you price them right and target an upscale market. Customers have to be able to afford to pay you for what your time is worth. If you do original designs, you should definitely emphasize that fact. People who pay for quality handmade goods are those that want something you can't get in your average retail store.

Good luck with this Bindu. I think you can find a way to make it work for you. You just  have to decide which way you want to go.

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Posts 44
RichardRose wrote
on Dec 21, 2010 4:07 AM

Well, the sort of thing that I sell most of is hanging towels. I also sell quite a few jug covers, wine glass socks and bookmarks. Baby clothes are also a reasonably good seller. As others have said, don't expect to be able to quit your day job as the best I manage is about $5/hour. Most of my stuff is priced a lot less than that, but then, I have only been selling at craft markets where people expect to find bargains.

 

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Posts 49
on Dec 22, 2010 4:38 PM

Interesting ideas. There is always something to be learned when a group of heads get to thinking together. Thank you for sharing!

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rasyida wrote
on Jan 8, 2011 5:27 PM

Hi Bindu,

I started sell the crochet online a few month back. Thanks god the response is not bad. Our target market is from Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Of course I'm not running all this stuff alone, support from family, friends who love crochet and our local group.

Thanks for sharing and I wish you all the best.

Rasyida

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nanclaypool wrote
on Feb 1, 2011 7:36 AM

Thanks for replying with a straightforward answer. One replier mentioned her grandmother (who is probably my age). That was then. I agree with another regarding what you make and targeting your market. If you use cheaper yarns, that's great for bulky items. If you are making lacier things, which are selling right now in certain markets, then they must be extra fine yarns and/or cottons in really beautiful patterns. One key is the words "Hand-made by design" as opposed to home-made-- hear the difference? Market like you would anything else. Be proud of what you've done..

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