Crochet Abbreviations

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shmoomin wrote
on Nov 7, 2011 8:03 AM

Hi

I'm a complete newbie to crochet - I started 2 days ago! I was shown how to do a single chain and what in the UK is known as  treble. I've worked my way through a couple of lessons and can do the basic single chain, slip stitch, double crochet, treble, double treble & double treble group.  I'm still happily workign through tutorials but found a pattern on Crochet Me which I want to do & is why I have joined.

 

I'm in the UK and I wanted to make sure that I'm understanding these abbreviations correctly!

Can someone please translate this for me? It's Julia V's Basic Fingerless Mittens.

fsc - is this another way of saying single chain (sc)?

tbl

sts

rd/rds - is this rounds?

 

I'd really appreciate ALL your help!  Thanks Embarrassed

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Toni Rexroat wrote
on Nov 7, 2011 11:16 AM

Hi! It sounds like you are a very fast learner! Yes rd/rds would indicate rounds.

Tbl stands for through the back loop only, so instead of inserting your hook under both loops of the stitch below, you would insert it under only the back loop.

Fsc stands for foundation single crochet. This is a stitch that allows you to create both the beginning chain and first row of single crochet at the same time. You can find instructions and illustrations for this stitch in the glossary.

Good luck and feel free to let me know if you have any more questions.

Best wishes,

Toni!

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shmoomin wrote
on Nov 9, 2011 7:45 AM

Hi

Thanks for this! I'm now familiarising myself with the stitches in the glossary I've not come across yet - or have but they've a different name!  Hopefully I'll get the mittens made soon.

Thanks again,

Sarah

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Mojo3322 wrote
on Dec 2, 2011 4:39 PM

Hi! You sound like you know a lot about this, so I would be greatful if you could help me.  I am pretty new to crocheting and am stuck in my pattern.  It tells me to "41 sc and 14 ch-3 sps" .  Would you be willing to explain this whole step to me?  I would really appreciate it!

 

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Toni Rexroat wrote
on Dec 2, 2011 4:48 PM

I would love to help you. I'm not sure I have enough information here, but I would guess that this is a stitch count at the end of a row. Lots of patterns will give you a count of how many stitches you should have worked in a row or round at the end of the row or round. If this doesn't seem to make sense with you pattern let me know. I am always happy to help.

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Mojo3322 wrote
on Dec 4, 2011 7:50 AM

I apologize for not providing more information.  You are exactly right, it is at the end of a row.  I completed the row up to the instructions in my previous post, but I'm not sure what those instructions mean.  If you could tell me what stitch/ count I'm supposed to do, that would really help me understand.   Especially, what does "14 ch- 3 sps" mean?  Thank you!

 

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Toni Rexroat wrote
on Dec 5, 2011 12:25 PM

You don't actually have to do any thing with those numbers. They are not stitches you have to complete, but instead are a tally of the stitches you have already completed in that row. So if the instructions told you to:

Sc in 2nd ch from hook, *sk next 3 ch, sh in next ch, sk next 3 ch, sc in next ch; rep from * across, turn—12 (12, 14, 14) sh.

The section in bold isn't telling you to work 12 shells, but is telling you that you have worked 12 shells already in that row. This is really helpful information because now you can count the number of shells you worked in the row. If you have the correct number of shells, you worked the row correctly. If you have too many or too few shells the next row will not work.

Much the same way the pattern I showed you is counting shells, the pattern you are working is counting ch-3 spaces. So after you have worked the row up to the (14 ch-3 sps) stop and count how many ch-3 spaces are in the row you just worked. If there are 14, you have the right number of stitches to work the next round.

Does that make sense? Please let me know if this is still confusing you. And thank you for all of your questions. This has really helped me to see which sections of a pattern could use some kind of beginners explanation.

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Mojo3322 wrote
on Dec 5, 2011 7:22 PM

Ohhhhh, that makes sense.  Sorry that you had to spell it out for me!  Thank you so much!!  I hope you don't mind if I ask you again should I get stuck....again.

 

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Toni Rexroat wrote
on Dec 6, 2011 10:40 AM

Not a problem. Smile I am happy to answer any other questions that might come up!

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