Hot Water! (A cozy.)

Apr 12, 2007
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Author

by Chloe Nightingale

Introduction

Hot water bottle cozy. Anchors away!
SAVE YOUR SCRAPS!

I've said this before, and I'll say it again: I have a little problem. Unless it's only a few inches long, I cannot throw yarn away. I even bought a bag of scrap yarn and odd balls from a thrift store once! This isn't really a bad thing. I don't like to waste yarn and my efforts to work through my stash of scraps have resulted in many creative ideas, patterns (many of which are on this site), and interesting FOs.

I am not alone in my efforts to use oddments and odd balls -- one may draw inspiration from the Odd Balls Knitting and Crocheting Flickr group.

I never had a hot water bottle until I moved to Glasgow, and now I wish I'd started using one before. I like to keep the heat off at night to save energy, but even under piles of blankets I am always a bit chilly when I first go to bed. A hot water bottle is a great way to keep cozy and warm -- I even like to use mine to keep my toes warm when I'm sitting at my desk at home. The thing is, if you want your hot water bottle to stay warm all night, you have to use really hot water, but then the hot water bottle is too hot to cuddle. That's why you need a hot water bottle cozy.  

I designed two versions. One is Fair Isle-inspired and is worked in the round using the tapestry crochet technique for part of it. The other is a patchwork cozy and is worked flat.

If you don't like the anchor chart provided, find a knitting or crochet chart and work from that. But c'mon, I had to use a nautical theme for my hot water bottle. I just couldn't help myself!

If you don't have a hot water bottle, you can use this pattern to make a bag or a pillow cover instead. Or not. Either way, I'm right. Just don't throw away your scraps!

Materials List

  • Patchwork versionApproximately 400 yards (370 m) scrap yarn is enough for either cozy (this is a generous estimation, you might not need that much). Worsted or aran weight is recommended for the pattern -- for thinner yarns, try using two complimentary strands at once; for thicker yarns, I recommend making the cozy a few stitches narrower and a few rows shorter to ensure a proper fit.
  • US G/7 (4.50 mm) hook or size needed to obtain gauge
  • Yarn needle
  • Stitch Marker

Finished Size

Will fit standard size hot water bottle, 8" x 11" (20 cm x 28 cm), not including the 'neck.' The Patchwork Cozy, 10" x 11" (25 cm x 28 cm), is a bit roomier than The Anchor Cozy, 8.5" x 11.5" (22 cm x 29 cm).

Gauge

The Patchwork Cozy: 16 sts x 17 rows of sc in the round = 4" (10 cm)

The Anchor Cozy: 15 sts x 16 rows of sc in the round = 4" (10 cm)

Notes

Pick colors that go together -- your project may be a real eyesore if you use colors or color combinations that don't work well together.

When working color changes from the anchor chart, I find it looks best to change color mid-stitch. For a single crochet stitch, the final yo and draw-through is done with the new color. Additionally, while working with one color, 'carry' the other by crocheting over it. This color-changing technique is known as tapestry crochet and is explained by Carol Ventura. (Ed. note: Also see Carol's Get Your Ducks in a Row pattern from this issue.)

Although I designated the colors for the anchor chart as MC (the background color) and CC (the anchor color), feel free to change either color as often as you'd like. For ideas and inspiration, I like to look at knitted Fair Isle pieces because they have marvelous color combinations and often change color every few rows.  

Also, please note that when working tapestry crochet in the round from the anchor chart, as well as any knitting chart, the finished work will turn out looking slightly italicized, or on a slant. This is normal and is due to crochet stitches being slightly off-set from round to round.  

You may wish to carry a yarn throughout The Anchor Cozy so that the thickness and drape is the same throughout. If you do not wish to carry a yarn throughout the pattern, you may wish to switch to lighter weight yarns, such as DK or sport weight yarns, when working the tapestry crochet section from the anchor chart.

The Pattern

The Patchwork Cozy

Big Squares (make 4, using any colors or combo of colors you like)

Ch 17, turn.  

Row 1. Starting in second ch from hook, sc in each st across, turn. (16 sts)

Rows 2-18. Ch 1, sc in each st across, turn.

Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Little Squares (make 16, using any colors or combo of colors you like)

Ch 9, turn.  

Row 1. Starting in second ch from hook, sc in each st across, turn. (8 sts)

Rows 2-18. Ch 1, sc in each st across, turn.

Fasten off. Weave in ends.

For the seams, feel free to use single crochet, slip stitch, or whipstitch. Using any yarn you like, seam little squares together in groups of 4 to make bigger squares.  Then join 2 big squares and 2 squares of 4 little squares together to make one side of the hot water bottle cover. Do the same for the other side.  Join front and back pieces together along bottom and sides.  

Attach yarn to either top corner of the cover. Ch 1, sc in each st around, sl st in beg ch-1 to close round. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in each st around the entire top of the cover, sl st in top of beg ch-3 to close round. Fasten off. Weave in ends.  

Take a piece of yarn about 2-3 feet long and weave it in and out between the dc posts -- this is the lace that ties up the top of the hot water bottle cozy. Pop your hot water bottle in the cozy and go!

The Anchor Cozy

Note: This pattern is worked in a spiral. To help keep track of rounds, place a stitch marker in the first stitch of the round to mark the beginning. Move the marker up as your work progresses.

With any color, ch 60, sl st in first ch to form ring, being careful not to twist the chain.

Rounds 1-7.  Sc in each st around, changing colors and yarns as often as you like.  Change to MC at the end of Rnd 7.

Round 8:  With MC, sc in each st around, begin to carry CC when there are 10 sts left in the round.  

Rounds 9-20:  Continue to work in sc, following chart for color changes.

Anchor Chart 

Round 21:  With MC, sc in each st around, you may stop carrying CC after first 10 sts in this round.  

Rounds 22-24:  Sc in each st around, changing colors & yarns as often as you like.  

Rounds 25-38:  Repeat Rounds 8-21.  

Rounds 39-43:  Sc in each st around, changing colors & yarns as often as you like.  

Round 44:  Sl st in next st, ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in each st around, sl st in top of beg ch-3 to join round.  

Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Seam bottom of piece together with whip stitch, sl st, or sc, using any yarn you'd like.

Take a piece of yarn about 2-3 feet long and weave it in and out between the dc posts -- this is the lace that ties up the top of the hot water bottle.  Pop your hot water bottle in the cozy and go!

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Comments

Holly wrote
on May 4, 2007 12:40 PM

Don't even throw the short little pieces of yarn away! Save them all winter, then in the spring, put them inside a net bag (like from onions) or a suet feeder (sans suet) and birds will use them to build beautiful, colorful nests!

on Sep 25, 2007 11:27 PM
Hi,
Thanks for the water bottle cozy! I, too, love my hot water bottle! I am from the States and had never used one till I visited my daughter in South Africa. They don't have ANY heat in their house, so I got introduced to the cuddly hot water bottle to stay warm at night! I have been thinking that I wish I could find a crochet pattern for a cover, and voila! Here it is!

THANKS!

NormaRae_40 wrote
on Nov 6, 2009 9:19 PM

How do you create a chart to make your own project?

Devonhens wrote
on Jan 12, 2010 1:55 PM

Just what I was looking for, thanks!